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Juneteenth research

Angela Roberts, Vice President

Happy Juneteenth!  On June 19, 1865, federal troops arrived in Galveston, TX to notify the slaves there that they were free. The slaves hadn’t been impacted by the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 which had been in effect more than two years prior. This may no longer be news to many reading this blog, but we’d be remiss to not reiterate what this day is all about as people contemplate how to celebrate it.  We’re celebrating freedom!  Juneteenth

On June 17, 2021, President Biden signed a bill into law declaring Juneteenth a federal holiday. This portmanteau, Juneteenth, now rings relevant for our entire nation regardless of race or ethnicity. You may also hear Juneteenth referred to as National Independence Day, Jubilee Day, Emancipation Day, Freedom Day, or Black Independence Day. No matter which name is used, it’s a time for our nation to celebrate freedom.  

At C+R, we opted to not close for business on Juneteenth after consulting with our internal diversity council, SpeC+Rum, and our multicultural team, CultureBeat, because we understand the importance of educating our employees about why some holidays, like Juneteenth, are culturally significant.  So, we will commemorate the day by displaying culturally relevant facts on three large TV monitors throughout our office to encourage conversations that promote diversity and inclusivity, and our employees are sure to learn some things as well.   

Test your own knowledge by taking some time to indulge in a bit of trivia about this day.  We’ll share a couple of nuggets with you here. Then, go on out and enjoy a BBQ, but don’t forget to share what you’ve learned here with family and friends. 

What does the Juneteenth flag look like and what does it symbolize? 
What color drink is associated with Juneteenth and why? 

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