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Emily Prozeller, Vice President of Qualitative Online Communities, joined C+R in 2011 to help build its online qualitative discipline.  Emily was a pioneer in the burgeoning field of online qualitative research and initially helped C+R to create its overall online capabilities and processes. More recently, Emily turned her attention to communities and panels – specifically, by helping to cultivate C+R’s more long-term offerings.

Now, with about 15 years of experience, Emily works across C+R’s online methodologies.  She currently oversees and conducts qualitative research, both outside of and within C+R’s community and panel offerings. She executes research that helps companies across categories unearth insights that drive making strategy and product development. Emily is immersed with experience with B2C and B2B targets.

Prior to joining C+R, Emily managed accounts and large-scale client initiatives at multiple companies that were original providers of consumer insights communities.  

Emily received a BA in Art History from Denison University.
 

  • What's your favorite thing about Market Research? What do you enjoy about Market Research? 

    I like that people – and their input – still surprise me. It's also interesting to see cultural trends emerge. 

  • How did you get into the market research industry? 

    I studied art history because I enjoyed looking at how many facets came together to create the context and execution – cultural, social, political, etc. I like piecing together the story.  

  • What's the best piece of advice you ever received? 

    When asked to give an opinion between options that are all suitable, say “I trust your judgment” instead of “I don’t care” or something along those lines. That decision matters to the person asking, so saying that you trust their judgment avoids giving them a flippant response. My husband and I use this back and forth but it keeps us in the positive! 

  • What advice do you have for others wanting to get into market research?

    Cultivate curiosity. And never assume you know the answer.